Archive for April 2017

Oh the Places You'll Go.....with IoT

Last week we attended the IoT NA conference in Rosemont, IL. As I stood at the booth I was amazed at not only the number of regional companies that were attending but also the different industries that were represented. I spoke to people from traditional industries like automotive and tech manufacturing, but I also spoke with attendees from a children’s museum, a drone company and several small cities across Illinois. Conversations with these people from “non-traditional” sector really got me thinking about how IoT can be utilized in pretty much every sector and the first movers from non-traditional industries will not only be able to give themselves an unbelievable competitive edge but also provide an incredible experience for their customers.

When the attendees from the museum came by, I could tell that they were on a scouting mission. They definitely recognized the value of using data from IoT, but were unsure of where to start. It makes sense --- when looking through the agenda of this conference there were fantastic sessions on sensors, the power of analytics and even monetizing IoT data. However, most sessions were aimed at manufacturing, because of course, manufacturing with its preventive maintenance and process improvements is the current leader in IoT projects. However, it may have seemed like a one-sided conference, however, many of the principles discussed can be applied to non-traditional industries. For example, many museums already have apps. Museums could use geolocation on the user’s phone to track how people are walking through the museum. This information, just like data collected from forklifts driven around a distribution center can be used to see who is traveling where, where people are stopping and how many people are visiting exhibits during certain time periods. This information can be invaluable to a museum (or a store or an airport and the list goes on….). It can show designers if current pathways are intuitive, identify which parts of an exhibit are the most/least popular and create better pathways for guests. If this information is utilized, exhibits can be tailored to what patrons are really interested in and also make sure patrons can easily navigate through exhibits – thus a happier guest who is more likely to return. Additionally, museums could combine information from a customer’s past navigation history and purchase history with their current location in the museum or even time that they’re in the museum. In real-time the app could make recommendations to the patron for special events occurring that day (for example, a lego building session for a family that has previously purchased legos or walked through a lego exhibit in the past) or current sales in the gift store when they are getting ready to exit the museum.

At the end of the day, non-traditional industries will not have out of the box solutions targeted to their specific needs. However, with research on what other industries are doing and a little creative thinking non-traditional industries can make very powerful and differentiating solutions. To take a page from Dr Suess these non-traditional industries needs to think about all of the places they can go…..with IoT.

For more information on how to get started with an Internet of Things project, please visit our website or e-mail us at info@entrigna.com.